Is Hershey’s Zero Sugar Keto Friendly? (Wait Until You Hear This)

Giving up chocolate to keep up with the ketogenic diet can be nearly unbearable for many. This is why they automatically search for alternatives to ease the pain. A lot of keto’ers out there often wonder if Hershey’s Zero Sugar is an option.

Unfortunately, this no sugar treat isn’t a good idea for anyone following the keto diet. This candy may not have any sugar, but it is packed with unhealthy ingredients that you should avoid. It also has things in it that will quickly kick you out of ketosis.

Now, don’t be mad at us; we are just the messengers. And while that may seem like bad news, there is some good news on the way. Stay tuned.

img of Hershey’s Zero Sugar

Hershey’s Zero Sugar is Not for Keto, and Here is Why

Although zero sugar sounds healthy, its advertisements can be deceiving. These small chocolate morsels can quickly kick you out of ketosis with masked ingredients you might not be aware of.

Let’s take a quick look at all the ingredients you will find in Hershey’s Zero Sugar. Can you spot the red flags?

  • Cream
  • Chocolate
  • Vanilla extract
  • Soy lecithin
  • Milk
  • Chocolate Processed with Alkali
  • Milk
  • Soy Lecithin
  • Maltitol
  • Polydextrose
  • Sodium caseinate
  • Cocoa Butter
  • Fat
  • Artificial flavor

First and foremost, we hope you noticed it includes maltitol. 

What is Maltitol?

To keep the great sweet flavor of Hershey’s chocolate, the company adds maltitol. This is an artificial sweetener often found in sugar free treats. 

Although maltitol is not sugar, it is digested by the body (at least partially). It will create a glycemic response in your blood and increase your glucose levels. After it is all said and done, you can kiss your state of ketosis goodbye. 

Maltitol isn’t the only thing in Hershey’s zero sugar you should watch out for though. 

There are 20 Grams of Carbs Per Serving

Yes, you read that right. There are 20 grams of carbs in every serving of Hershey’s Zero Sugar. At least in the mini milk chocolate candy bars. In this product, there are only four bars per serving.

While following keto, you are only allotted 20-50 grams of carbs per day. If you were to eat just one candy bar, that is 5 grams of carbs. 

First, who only eats one? Second, that is taking up a lot of your daily carb intake. You should try to incorporate as many “healthy” carbs as possible here as possible. Ones that will give you nutrients and clean energy.

Types of Zero Sugar Candies By Hershey

Most people think of chocolate when they think of Hershey. That is for a good reason since most of their popular candies are made from chocolate. Yet, this is not all they offer, and sadly, every one of them should be avoided when following keto.

  • Zero Sugar Jolly Ranchers- 15 grams of carbs in 4 pieces
  • Zero Sugar York Peppermint Patty- 16 grams of carbs in 2 pieces
  • Zero Sugar Special Dark- 19 grams of carbs in 4 pieces
  • Zero Sugar Reeses Minis- 16 grams of carbs in 3 pieces
  • Zero Sugar Twizzlers- 22 grams of carbs in 4 pieces

If that is the number of carbs per serving, can you imagine how many you would consume eating a whole bag?

While there are a few great candies out there for anyone living the keto life, the Hershey Zero Sugar line isn’t one of them. These snacks should be avoided at all costs, ideally whether you are on a ketogenic diet or not.

FAQs

Can You Eat Hershey’s Zero Sugar Candy on Keto?

Sorry to say, you should steer clear of Hershey’s zero sugar candies when following keto. The number of carbs and the addition of maltitol will kick anyone out of ketosis.

How Many Carbs Are in Hershey’s Zero Sugar Candy?

The number of carbs in each product will vary. But most options contain anywhere from 15 to 22 grams of carbs per serving.

Can You Have Hershey’s Zero Sugar Dark Chocolate? 

While dark chocolate is typically okay in moderation on keto, you shouldn’t eat Hershey’s zero sugar option. This product contains artificial sweeteners that will increase your glucos. It also contains a high number of carbohydrates. 

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